love divine, all loves excelling versions

As is customary in a Charles Wesley text, biblical allusions abound. [28], Abbreviated Unitarian and Universalist versions of the Fix in us your humble dwelling; All your faithful mercies crown. "Blaenwern" by William Penfro Rowlands (1860–1937);[39] and "Moriah"[40]—the latter two especially in Great Britain. all thy faithful mercies crown. [13], A second, abridged version (with the second stanza omitted), appeared as early as 1778 in Hymns and Psalms for the Service of Fitz-Roy Chapel (London, 1778), then in the Wesleyan "Large Hymn Book" of 1780, and thence in many others, chiefly British and predominantly Anglican, but including also many later official Methodist hymn books. but the theme and force of the original are wholly lost. Today, please consider a gift and a word of encouragement to support our work. perfectly restored in thee. Includes words and scores for public domain hymns. Love Divine all Loves Excelling This hymn by Charles Wesley (1707 – 1788) was first published in in his "Hymns for those that Seek, and those that Have Redemption", published in Bristol in 1747. The original 1st line of stanza 1 says "all loves excelling". Wesleyan theology speaks of the transforming work of the Spirit in us as an ongoing journey, not a one-time event. would be useless, and indeed almost impracticable, to specify all And yet this hymn reorients us to see that this beautiful wedding and marriage is only, and can only ever be, a reflection of the Love above all loves. This Printable version of Love Divine All Love Excelling is a hymn of praise and worship which is suitable for all Christian denominations. "justly famous and beloved, better known than almost any other hymn of Charles Wesley. Let us all … In 1780 it was included, with the omission of stanza ii., in the Wesleyan Hymn Book, No. 1. [11], Like many hymns, Love Divine is loosely Trinitarian in organization: Christ is invoked in the first stanza as the expression of divine love; the Holy Spirit in the second stanza as the agent of sanctification; the Father in the third stanza as the source of life; and the Trinity (presumably) in the final stanza as the joint Creator of the New Creation. Though this stanza was an outcome of the Specifically Wesleyan doctrine of perfection, it is our fervent Christian prayer that our sanctification will ultimately lead to glorification. composer. Jesus, Thou art all compassion; Pure, unbounded love Thou art. Jesus, source of all compassion, Love unbounded, love all pure; Visit us with your salvation, Let your love in us endure.2. Madan 1760 and 1767 and Conyers 1772, Toplady 1776, Whitefield 1767 and 1800, Huntingdon 1780 and 1800, Taylor 1777, In many modern American collections, from. In Dryden's song, the goddess of love chooses the Isle of Britain over her native Cyprus; in Wesley's hymn divine love itself is asked to choose the human heart as its residence over its native heaven. Take away the love of sinning; till we cast our crowns before thee, Judging by general repute, it is among Wesley's finest: justly famous and beloved, better known than almost any other hymn of Charles Wesley. The hymn Love Divine, All Loves Excelling, printed above, has been undergone numerous editions due to the various ideas about Christian perfection. [14], The omission of the second stanza is consistent with several other loci of textual variation in the hymn in this respect: the passages which are most subject to change tend for the most part to be those that This ceremony was so celebrated because it represented the “dream” for romance - a prince finding his princess, true loves coming together, and a couple rising above the odds to be together. As a sung prayer, probably towards the end of the service or, given its tone of praise, as a closing hymn; Advent. of the third (omitting the remainder of each);[25] another that omits the third stanza, as well as introducing some aesthetic changes that tend toward the bland;[26] another that combines the first half of stanza 1 with the first half of stanza 2 into a single new stanza 1 and retains a modified version of stanza 4 as a new stanza 2;[27] and yet another that omits the fourth. is transformed into a two-stanza paean to God narrowly addressed as "Father...almighty"; set our hearts at liberty. Let us see thy great salvation the Exeter Unitarian Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Social and Private Worship (1812). This, we argue so easily, is love. 2 Come, almighty to deliver, let us all your grace receive; suddenly return, and never, First line: Love divine, all loves excelling. The ceremony featured a number of hymns, one of which was “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling,” a hymn that is both appropriate and seemingly paradoxical for a wedding. End of faith, as its beginning, --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907). #172, The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration #92, The New National Baptist Hymnal (21st Century Edition) #65, I have already donated. Martin Shaw), "Autumn" (variously described as a "Spanish melody, from Marechio", "In Babilone" (Dutch trad. [The Love of Christ.] Orchestration: 2 fl, 2 ob, 2 cl, 2 bn, 4 hn, 3 tpt, 3 tbn, tba, timp, perc, org, str. and rosy morning" (1782), this combination Benson, p. 330. Jesus, thou art all compassion, pure, unbounded love thou art; visit us with thy salvation, enter every trembling heart. It has been sung to a version of Purcell’s original tune. A separate copy of this score must be purchased for each choir member. In many instances..., the melody, harm. However, as the Psalter Hymnal Handbook expresses, “it is our fervent Christian prayer that our sanctification will ultimately lead to glorification,” and the line should not cause any discomfort. [12], At its first appearance, the hymn was in four stanzas of eight lines (8.7.8.7.D), and this four-stanza version remains in common and current use to the present day, being taken up as early as 1760 in Anglican collections such as those by Madan (1760 and 1767), Conyers (1772), and Toplady (1776); in hymn books associated with 1 Love divine, all loves excelling, joy of heaven, to earth come down, fix in us your humble dwelling, all your faithful mercies crown. [36], In current use, the hymn seems to be set most often, particularly in American hymnals, to the tune Beecher by John Zundel (1815–1882; from Can God take away from us our power of sinning without taking away our power of free obedience? resolves some ambiguous referents. We are so grateful to be able to provide timeless hymns to all and thankful to all who support us with gifts of time, talent and treasure. With unusual clarity, Kreeft points out that the man or woman who begins to glimpse the God who is Creator, Redeemer, and Lover of our souls, will never be the same. Take away our bent to sinning;" I prefer "promised" rest to "second" rest because it is more biblical, but greatly prefer "bent to sinning" over "love of sinning". Love divine, all loves excelling, joy of heaven, to earth come down; fix in us thy humble dwelling; all thy faithful mercies crown! Let us all in Thee inherit, Guitar, Bass, and Handbells, I Could Sing of Your Love Forever (with "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling", The Art of Hymn Playing: 250 Introductions, Preludes, Free Accompaniments, & Alternate Harmonizations 2nd Edition, I Could Sing of Your Love Forever (with "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling"), Love Divine, All Loves Excelling - (Choral Score), LOVE DIVINE, ALL LOVES EXCELLING (Baptist Hymnal 1991 - 208), LOVE DIVINE, ALL LOVES EXCELLING (Gray Psalter 568), LOVE DIVINE, ALL LOVES EXCELLING (Voices United 1996 - 333), Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #366, Lift Up Your Hearts: psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs #351. I led with 'Love divine' for the first time on Sunday. [18], "Pure and sinless let us be" (stanza 4) was toned down, or at least made less absolute, by alteration to "Pure and holy," (Toplady 1776 again, followed again by the Countess of Huntingdon 1780 and 1800) Breathe, O breathe Thy loving Spirit Into every troubled breast! Please don't show this to me again this fund drive, Year B, Christmas season, First Sunday after Christmas Day, Year C, Easter season, Ascension of the Lord, A Book of Hymns for Public and Private Devotion (15th ed.) 2. in the radical alterations they make, replacing most references to Both of these changes were introduced by Augustus Toplady's collection of 1776, followed by the Countess of Huntingdon's collections (e.g. #8, A Collection of Hymn Tunes from the most modern and approved authors #XI, A Manual of Worship: for the chapel of Girard College #123, A Pocket hymn book, designed as a constant companion for the pious: collected from various authors #LXXVIII, A Pocket Hymn Book: designed as a constant companion for the pious, collected from various authors (9th ed.) sister projects: Wikipedia article, Wikidata item. At its first appearance, the hymn was in four stanzas of eight lines (8.7.8.7.D), and this four-stanza version remains in common and current use to the present day, being taken up as early as 1760 in Anglican collections such as those by Madan (1760 and 1767), Conyers (1772), and Toplady (1776); in hymn books associated with Whitefield(1767, 1800) and the Countess of Huntingdon's Connection (1780, and 1800); and in Methodist hymn books slightly outside the mainstream (the Select Hymns of 1783; Spenc… 1 Love divine, all loves excelling, Joy of heav'n, to earth come down! Oh dont get me wrong, God loves the Whole world. Are parts of this score outside of your desired range? To donate online, please use the Calvin University secure giving site. This is a well-loved and oft-used tune, but it presents one fault in what Paul Westermeyer describes as a “yowl” of the upward major sixth between the first and second measure (Let the People Sing, 316). Edition notes: The hymn to the alternative tune Blaenwern in the version published in Hymns Ancient & Modern New Standard, melody with words. Jesus, Thou art all compassion, Pure unbounded love Thou art; Visit us with Thy salvation, Enter every trembling heart. under the title "Praise to Thee, Thou Great Creator," "Love Divine" serves as a source for a cento, or for SATB and organ or brass ensemble or full orchestra. Love divine, all loves excelling – Blaenwern. Jesus, thou art all compassion, Pure, unbounded love thou art; Visit us with thy salvation, Enter ev'ry trembling heart. Some hymnals also leave out the second stanza, with the line, “Take away our bent to (power of) sinning.”. modern British collections;[41] Airedale, by Sir C. V. Stanford, appeared in the 1924 edition by the authors of Lyric Studies. CCLI, OneLicense, etc). See the left menu for different versions, PowerPoint Slides, printable PDF's, Android Apps, and audio speed. pastiche, combined with the version from 1841 (and similarly in the Unitarian hymnal of 1872[31]) the four-stanza Trinitarian hymn to Christ and his Spirit Jesus, thou art all compassion, Pure unbounded love thou art; Visit us with thy salvation, Enter every trembling heart. 374, and in this form it has passed into a large number of hymn-books in all English-speaking countries. glory in thy perfect love. Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Words by Charles Wesley (1707-1788) Tune: BEECHER by John Zundel (1815-1882) Key signature: B flat major (2 flats) Meter: 8.7.8.7.D. Love Divine, All Loves Excelling is a Christian hymn by Charles Wesley with a theme of Christian perfection. 2 Breathe, oh, breathe thy loving spirit Into every troubled breast; Love Divine, all loves excelling. So be careful to glide into that note gracefully. A second tune is the beloved Welsh HYFRYDOL, by Rowland Hugh Pritchard, commonly sung to “Alleluia, Sing to Jesus” and “I Will Sing of My Redeemer.” BLAENWERN, another Welsh tune, composed by William Penfro Rowlands, is most popular in Great Britain. It had previously appeared in full in M. Madan's Psalms & Hymns, 1760; A. M. Toplady's Psalms & Hymns, 1776, and other hymn-books of the Church of England. Christian Heart Songs, 1870);[37] and to the stately Welsh tunes "Hyfrydol" by Rowland Hugh Prichard (1811–1887);[38] [32] Several rephrasings of "Love Divine" continue in circulation. FlexScores are available in the Media section below. Love Divine, all loves excelling, Joy of heaven, to earth come down, Fix in us thy humble dwelling, All thy faithful mercies crown. Another exception is the two-stanza adaptation by Carroll Thomas Andrews (1969) that has Suddenly return, and never, The first is BEECHER, composed by John Zundel in 1870 for this text.

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